Archive for November 2013

Nikkei eases further off 6-month high; Panasonic, Nikon up

* Nikon D5300 CouponsSources say Panasonic to sell 3 Japan chip plants, stock up * Rakuten jumps after being promoted to main board Topix By Dominic Lau TOKYO, Nov 27 (Reuters) - Japan's Nikkei share average edged lower on Wednesday on profit-taking, peeling further away from a six-month high, though traders said investors were looking for opportunities to pick up bargains. Nikon Corp, Ricoh Co Ltd and Canon Inc were in demand, up between 0.8 and 3.1 percent after U.S. Hewlett-Packard Co beat revenue forecasts. Nikon is down 23.6 percent year-to-date and is the worst underperformer in the Nikkei this year, while the benchmark has rallied nearly 49 percent. The Nikkei shed 0.4 percent to 15,461.20 in mid-morning trade on Wednesday, easing further away from a six-month high hit on Monday. "The market itself is a little bit down today, but still people are looking for opportunities on the long side," a Tokyo-based sales trader said. "Now that the earnings are over, people are looking for growth scenarios," he added, referring to the company earnings reporting season. Panasonic Corp rose 3 percent to a near three-year high after sources said the consumer electronics maker will sell three semiconductor plants in Japan to Israeli chipmaker TowerJazz, bringing it closer to completing the overhaul of its loss-making businesses. The sources also said Panasonic is in talks with another company to sell its five overseas chip factories. Rakuten Inc jumped 10.2 percent after the Tokyo Stock Exchange said the e-commerce operator will be promoted to the main board Topix from Jasdaq for emerging companies, starting Dec. 3. Currency-sensitive exporters came under pressure as the yen came off a six-month low against the dollar overnight. Honda Motor Co Ltd, Mazda Motor Corp, Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd and Daikin Industries Ltd were off between 0.4 and 2.4 percent. As of Tuesday's close, Mazda Motor and Fuji Heavy Industries were the second- and third-best performers in the Nikkei this year, with gains of about 160 percent. Mobile operator SoftBank Corp was the best performer, though the stock was down 2 percent on profit-taking on Wednesday morning. A senior trader from a U.S. bank in Tokyo said he did not expect massive profit-taking in the next few days as November tends to be the year-end for many hedge funds. "Hedge funds have made good money this year and that those who were planning on getting quieter towards the year-end have already reduced their positions," he said. Underscoring the positive momentum, the pace of deterioration in Topix's one-month earning momentum slowed to -0.65 this month from -1.83 in October. The Topix dipped 0.2 percent to 1,250.70, with volume at 27 percent of fully daily average for the past 90 trading days.
Source: Reuters
Wednesday, November 27, 2013
Posted by Karon

Nikon D5300 First Shots: Can Nikon's new mid-level DSLR not only beat the D5200, but compete with the D7100?


In less than a year's time, the recently introduced Nikon D5300 has replaced the mid-level consumer D5200 DSLR. And while its upgrades may not be revolutionary, the new model stands as a compelling, affordable option for advanced amateurs who may be eyeing the higher-end, prosumer D7100 -- as well as an enticement for owners of Nikon's older models to take a step up. We just got the Nikon D5300 into the lab, and we've published our first batch of First Shots -- Still Life* test images -- for you to analyze closely.
The D5300's enhanced DX-format, 24-megapixel APS-C-type CMOS sensor was designed to maximize the camera's resolving power by omitting the optical low-pass filter (as Nikon did earlier this year with the D7100). If the D5300 can minimize moire and anti-aliasing as well as the D7100 did, forgoing the OLPF in a consumer-friendly DSLR could be the move that opens up a realm of incredible detail and sharpness to a mass audience. What's more, the D5300 incorporates Nikon's latest processor -- the EXPEED 4 -- which even the company's most recently announced full-frame prosumer DSLR, the D610, doesn't have. This next-generation imaging engine purports optimize the DSLR's detail-versus-noise output and enhance color accuracy, and its improved ISO sensitivity -- now ranging from 100 to 12,800 in standard mode -- could up the ante on low-light performance.
How do all these upgrades translate in terms of image quality?
Check out our Nikon D5300 First Shots for yourself. And be sure to pit these test images side-by-side with those from the D5200, D7100 -- or any other camera we've ever tested -- via our Comparometer™ image quality comparison tool.
For more information about the DSLR's new features and specs, read our first impressions Nikon D5300 review. In addition to image quality and performance enhancements, the camera also boasts built-in Wi-Fi functionality and GPS -- the first Nikon DSLR to do so -- as well as a more compact and lightweight design, and a 3-2-inch tilt-swivel LCD monitor that features a whopping 1,037K dots of resolution.
* Use our Still Life target images to look for detail (tone-on-tone, fine, highlights, shadows), as well as noise suppression, white balance, color accuracy and color shape retention.
Order your Nikon D5300 with trusted Imaging Resource affiliates Adorama or B&H now. The D5300 body runs about US$700, and kitted with a Nikon 18-140mm lens about $1,400.
Adorama:
B&H:

Source: Imaging-resource
Saturday, November 23, 2013
Posted by Karon

Nikon D5300 Digital SLR Wi-Fi Camera

Nikon just introduced the D5300 DSLR camera, which offers an enhanced 24.2-megapixel DX-format CMOS sensor, EXPEED 4 image processing, Vari-angle LCD, GPS and the convenience of built-in Wi-Fi. The mid-range SLR is compact and lightweight (16.9 oz.), and can easily be packed for a day trip or a planned getaway. The small body of the D5300 affords the photographer the freedom to travel while still being easy to handle and comfortable to use.
The D5300 is Nikon's first D-SLR to feature built-in Wi-Fi, allowing the user to share high quality photos instantly. The Nikon D5300 sends images to the user's smart device, allowing them to share their D-SLR quality photos through e-mail and social media. The Nikon D5300 also includes built-in GPS, another first for Nikon D-SLRs. Now the user can geotag images and allow others to see where life has taken them.
The enhanced 24.2-megapixel CMOS sensor delivers stunning images and HD videos with heightened clarity and detail due to the removal of the optical low pass filter (OLPF). Its 39-point high-density autofocus system with 9 cross-type sensors quickly locks onto your subject, and Nikon's unique 3D-tracking uses the 2,016-pixel RGB sensor to recognize and follow it across the frame.
Features:
  • Amazing Low Light Performance - For clean, sharp details even in the most challenging lighting conditions including night games and dimly lit restaurants, the Nikon D5300 covers a wide ISO range of 100-12,800 and is expandable to ISO 25,600.
  • EXPEED 4 Image Processing - Nikon's most recent image processing engine drives the rapid response and swift performance of the D5300, while maximizing energy efficiency, reducing image noise and delivering true-to-life colors.
  • Scene Recognition System - To further help users capture the image they intend, the Nikon D5300 features Nikon's Scene Recognition System and 2,016-pixel RGB metering system to analyze and recognize the scene. Utilizing these systems results in adjustments to exposure, AF and white balance to deliver the best photo possible, whether it's a landscape or portrait.
  • 39-Point AF System - Nikon's quick and precise 39-point AF system works with the Scene Recognition System to accurately acquire and track subjects throughout the frame, resulting in tack-sharp images. Kids too active to pose for a photo or pets chasing after a toy are easily captured in brilliant sharpness for memorable photos.
  • 5 Frames-Per-Second - While using the optical viewfinder or in Live View, capture great moments that would have otherwise been missed with the D5300′s 5 frames-per-second (fps) rate.
  • 3.2-inch Vari-Angle LCD monitor - Whether shooting above a crowd or getting low to capture the details of a flower, users can explore new shots from a dramatic point of view with the large 3.2-inch Vari-angle LCD monitor. This super sharp (1,037K-dot) screen allows photographers to easily make camera adjustments and read menus, while also allowing them to compose the photo they want clearly when shooting from high or low angles. The rotating LCD makes it easy to capture "selfies" at an arm's length away or frame creative perspectives when capturing still photos and HD video.
  • Full HD 1080p Video Capture - Create movies fit for the big screen with Full HD 1080p video capture at 60p with built-in stereo, wide ISO range for high quality videos in any light and improved full-time AF to keep the subject in focus.
  • NIKKOR Compatibility - The Nikon D5300 is compatible with Nikon's legendary NIKKOR lenses and powerful system accessories, further adding versatility and creativity.
Price and Availability
The Nikon D5300 kit with the AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR lens will be available in October 2013 for$1,399.95. Available colors include Black, Red and Gray.

Source: Ecoustics
Wednesday, November 13, 2013
Posted by Karon

Nikon Df: A retro-styled full-frame DSLR


Nikon has revealed its latest full-frame camera, the Nikon Df. The new DSLR boasts the same 16.2-megapixel FX sensor as the flagship D4, but in a much smaller and retro-styled body. Aimed squarely at photography enthusiasts and purists, it's been designed to pay homage to the Nikon F, F3 and FM/FE series of 35mm film cameras and features mechanical control dials galore.
While we've seen plenty of retro-inspired cameras in recent years, including the Fujifilm X100S, the Olympus PEN E-P5 and the Panasonic GX7, these have all been either fixed-lens or mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras. The Df is the first retro DSLR, and as such was never going to be as small as the recently announced mirrorless Sony Alpha 7s, though it is the smallest ever FX DSLR.
Inside the Df there's a 16.2-megapixel full-frame FX CMOS sensor (36 x 23.9 mm), which is paired with the Nikon EXPEED 3 image processing engine for producing top-notch image quality. An ISO range of 100-12,800 means the camera should be a solid low-light performer, and it's capable of continuous burst shooting at 5.5 fps. Auto-focus is dealt with by a 39-point Multi-CAM 4800 AF system which has nine cross-type sensors, like that in the Nikon D610.

The most striking feature of the Nikon Df is undoubtedly its abundance of mechanical dial-based manual controls, which add to its retro good looks and give it a feel to match. Settings with dedicated control dials include shutter speed, ISO, exposure compensation, and shooting mode. There are also enough other controls, including function buttons on the front, to keep most enthusiasts happy.
An optical glass pentaprism viewfinder gives 100 percent frame coverage, and there's a 3.2-inch LCD on the rear with a 921-k dot resolution. A rugged build quality sees magnesium alloy covers used on the top, bottom, and rear of the 143.5 x 110 x 66.5 mm (5.6 x 4.3 x 2.6 in) and 765 g (1 lb, 11 oz) camera. It also boasts the same level of weather sealing as the Nikon D800.

It's interesting to note that in playing to the photography purist market (or perhaps because of a lack of space) Nikon has omitted video capabilities from the Df. This will no doubt rule it out for some photographers, while delighting others. The Df also forgoes Compact Flash card compatibility in favor of a single SD slot. Additionally there's no built-in flash, or indeed Wi-Fi, though it has a hot-shoe for an external flash and is compatible with the WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter.
Reaffirming the Df's status as an enthusiast's camera, it will not ship with the standard compromising zoom kit lens. Instead, there's the option of a 50-mm F1.8 G kit lens, which has matching retro looks. The Nikon Df is also compatible with virtually all Nikon F-mount lenses, not just current AF, AF-S, DX and AF-D NIKKOR offerings. Thanks to a collapsible metering coupling lever located on the bayonet, classic Ai and pre-Ai NIKKOR glass can also be used.
Available in silver or black color schemes, the Nikon Df will go on sale later this month with a body-only price of US$2,800, or $3,000 with the 50-mm F1.8 G kit lens.
Product page: Nikon Df

Simon is a journalist and photographer who has spent the last ten years working for national UK newspapers - but has never hacked a mobile phone - and specializes in writing about weird products and photography technology. When not writing for Gizmag, Simon is often found playing with LEGO and drinking far too much coffee. All articles by Simon Crisp
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Source: Gizmag
Wednesday, November 6, 2013
Posted by Karon

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